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  • CTQ’s for Heath & Fitness

    Posted on May 8th, 2009 Nelson Bodnarchuk No comments

    According to the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), there is a rising prevalence of childhood obesity in most developed countries. In an article published on the 31st of March, 2009 titled Tackling the Epidemic of Childhood Obesity, not minding ones health and fitness during the course of ones life will have many short- and long-term health complications that can occur as a result. Neglecting the health and fitness aspect in life may not affect the duration in years however, it will most likely affect the quality of life during those years. However there have been several studies that show consistent exercise and a proper diet contribute to a higher quality of life.

    If one was to look at health & fitness as a high priority project that, if executed well, will improve the quality and performance of the body, the body being the customer in this case, obtaining the Critical to Satisfaction (CTS), or sometimes referred to Critical to Customer (CTC) in Six Sigma circles, and then distilling the Critical to Quality (CTQ) factors would be a key step in helping to define the factors to focus on what will improve one’s health and fitness.

    For arguments sake we’re going to neglect “Genetics” as a factor and focus on the variables that one can easily control.

    You’re free to rate these as you’d like, or add your own, but here’s my list from top to bottom:

    • Rest = 8 hrs of sleep/night
    • Water = 10 x 250mL/day
    • Food = 6 meals/day, consisting of 45/35/20 Ratio of Complex Carbs/Protien/Essential Fats
    • Exercise = 45min of increased & sustained exertion on the body
    • Sun/Fresh Air = 2-4 hrs/day
    • Relaxation = 2-4 hrs/day

    That’s my list. I don’t always have the opportunity to meet all of these requirements everyday, sometimes voluntary, however if there was a control panel that had six dials that represented each of the factors above I’d be dialing in to those rates every day. I guess the next step, if this were a DMAIC project, would be to perform an MSA and calculate the variability in my own measurement system, but I’ll save that for another post.